Spondylolisthesis

Sp1 Spondylolisthesis

Spondylolisthesis is one of the most common cause of low back pain in adolescen athletes. This can be seen on X-ray is a stress fracture in one of the bones (vertebrae) that make up the spinal column. It usually affects the fifth lumbar vertebra in the lower back and, much less commonly, the fourth lumbar vertebra.

If the stress fracture weakens the bone so much that it is unable to maintain its proper position, the vertebra can start to shift out of place. If too much slippage occurs, the bones may begin to press on nerves and surgery may be necessary to correct the condition.

Causes

Genetics

There may be a hereditary aspect to spondylolysis. An individual may be born with thin vertebral bone and therefore may be vulnerable to this condition. Significant periods of rapid growth may encourage slippage.

Overuse

Some sports, such as gymnastics, weight lifting, and football, put a great deal of stress on the bones in the lower back. They also require that the athlete constantly overstretch (hyperextend) the spine. In either case, the result is a stress fracture on one or both sides of the vertebra.

• In many people, spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis are present, but without any obvious symptoms.

• Pain usually spreads across the lower back and may feel like a muscle strain.

• Spondylolisthesis can cause spasms that stiffen the back and tighten the hamstring muscles, resulting in changes to posture and gait. If the slippage is significant, it may begin to compress the nerves and narrow the spinal canal.

Dignosis

X-rays of the lower back (lumbar) spine will show the position of the vertebra.
The pars interarticularis is a portion of the lumbar spine. It joins together the upper and lower joints. The pars is normal in the vast majority of children.

Di1 Spondylolisthesis

Treatment

Nonsurgical Treatment

Initial treatment for spondylolysis is always nonsurgical. The individual should take a break from the activities until symptoms go away, as they often do. Anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen, may help reduce back pain.

Occasionally, a back brace and physical therapy may be recommended. In most cases, activities can be resumed gradually and there will be few complications or recurrences. Stretching and strengthening exercises for the back and abdominal muscles can help prevent future recurrences of pain.

Periodic X-rays will show whether the vertebra is changing position.

Surgical Treatment

Surgery may be needed if slippage progressively worsens or if back pain does not respond to nonsurgical treatment and begins to interfere with activities of daily living. A spinal fusion is performed between the lumbar vertebra and the sacrum. Sometimes, an internal brace of screws and rods is used to hold together the vertebra as the fusion heals.

Comments (1)

  1. I am diagnose from isthmic spondylolisthesis,severity of the slippage about 55%, L5 pars fracture. Sometimes feel leg pain if standing for prolong hours, Can you provide any solution to this condition other than spin fusion surgery?

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